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Being a Hotelier has changed me

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Being a Hotelier has changed me

  • Reflecting back on my career I realized there are 8 ways being a hotelier has changed me!
  • From the things you experience, the skills you acquire and the challenges you have to overcome. To the difficulties you encounter along the way. All have the capacity to change you. Whether it is for better or for worse is completely up to you.
Hugot Hotelier PH avatar say at a desk in front of a silver laptop

Reflecting back on my career I realized there are 8 ways being a hotelier has changed me!

Of course the career paths we choose in life have the power to mold us into completely different people from the ones who just stepped fresh out of school.  

From the things you experience, the skills you acquire and the challenges you have to overcome. To the difficulties you encounter along the way. All have the capacity to change you. Whether it is for better or for worse is completely up to you.

Certainly being a hotelier has changed me!

Looking back at my pre-hotelier self and comparing it to the person I am now, I see 8 ways being a hotelier has changed me.  Some changes are significant. Others not so much.  Thankfully, most are positive.  

Here are the 8 ways being a hotelier has changed me since I entered the wonderful world of the hospitality industry!

 

I have become kinder to customer service personnel.

I used to be one of those people who would breeze past security guards and sales ladies without acknowledging their greeting. Or even so much as glancing at them.  

woman in a white shirt and blue skirt walking past a hotel concierge with her nose in the air, without acknowledging his greeting

When I started working at a hotel, I realized how bad it feels to greet a guest (with full energy!) and have them completely ignore you and treat you like you are invisible.  

It doesn’t take a lot to greet back “good morning!” or even just a simple nod or smile will suffice.   

Now I make sure to always greet them back and smile. Whether it is in a mall, hotel or any other establishments.  It’s actually basic human decency that we tend to take for granted until we are actually put in their situation.

 

I tip more than I used to.

We often don’t realize how much even a small tip can help a person. Or make their day so much better.  Working in a hotel made me realize that even a Php20 tip has the power to turn a bad day around.  

A lot of the time it’s not even about the money. It’s the fact that someone appreciates your service enough to give you a little extra even when they don’t have to.  

A girl standing in front of her house tipping a food delivery driver: 8 ways being a hotelier has changed me by MY RANGGO Hospitality Magazine Philippines

Now, whenever I can, I pay it forward to the customer service providers that I encounter daily. From servers to taxi drivers to delivery riders. I make sure to give a tip even if it’s just a small amount.  

It could be a small thing for you, but a huge help for them.

 

I have become an expert at keeping calm under pressure.

I used to be so easily rattled over small things.  Minor inconveniences seemed bigger than they actually were because of my mindset and the way I let myself get so affected.  

However, when I started working as a hotelier, all that changed.  

Having experienced solving one problem after another. Or managing one crisis after another. I have become a textbook definition of being “calm under pressure.”  

After all, there’s no problem that can’t be solved.  Some just take a bit more time and effort. But managing to keep your cool is already half the battle.

 

I have more patience with people.

Computers will hang. Printers will jam. People will mess up your order. Mistakes will happen.  

Working in the hotel industry has made me realize that a lot of things can happen that are beyond the control of the staff.  It has taught me to give a little grace when it’s my turn to be a customer.  

A hotelier standing at front desk with a guest explaining that the computer has frozen. MY RANGGO Hospitality Magazine Philippines

When the service is a bit slow.  When they are short of manpower. When their computers are not cooperating. When the staff seem to be having an off day. I breathe and try to put myself in their shoes.  

After all, I’ve been there, and in these situations, a little patience and kindness goes a long way.

 

I notice the small details more.

Being a hotelier trains you to spot even the tiniest things that could potentially affect guest experience.  A busted light bulb, a wet spot on the floor, a billing error.  

This training spills over to life outside the hotel and makes you notice (and fix) the small details right away.  

 

I never forget to say thank you.

Working in the service industry, I know that the guests are paying to be served and that the reason I have a job is because of these paying guests.  However, it feels good when guests acknowledge your effort and hard work and take time to say “thank you.”  

So, I try to do the same whenever I get to be a guest or a customer.  

Hugot Hotelier avatar saying thank you to a housekeeper: Article 8 ways being a hotelier has changed me

Expressing your gratitude for their service is absolutely free, and can make such a big impact.  I even take it a step further for exceptional service by leaving a nice commendation letter or feedback on their social media.  

 

I have become more confident.

Dealing with different types of guests all day has honed my communication skills and has given me confidence to deal with all kinds of people.  

It has made me more assertive and able to speak out more.  

The grooming standards I became accustomed to has also contributed to my increased confidence levels. It has become second nature for me to always look polished and professional whenever I leave the house.  

Being a hotelier has given me a certain sense of pride that shows up in the way I carry myself with poise and confidence.

 

I look forward to time spent alone.

When you have to plaster a smile on your face, or talk to hundreds of people and remain pleasant. Or be professional even if you’re having the roughest day, there is an immense sense of peace when you are finally off from work.  

When you are all alone in the car or in your room you can finally strip off the “hotelier” persona. You can relax into your resting b*tch face, rest your vocal cords and hear yourself think again.  

Tomorrow is another day, but for now, please leave me alone.

 

Have you also noticed any of these changes in yourself  since you entered the hospitality industry? 

What other positive or negative changes have you observed? 

Let me know in the comments!

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